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Presenting a roundup of interesting stories from around the Web, usually with a Charlotte angle.

Politico - DNC convention cities on edge - Will Miller, who is heading up Charlotte's effort to land the Democratic National Convention, is quoted extensively in a report on the tense anticipation that the four finalist cities are feeling. (Love Miller comparing the city's cautious enthusiasm to "waiting tables.") The story says a decision likely will not come until February.

Anthony Foxx's 'Tweet Conference' - Mayor Anthony Foxx, whom we profiled in the January issue, took questions Sunday night on Twitter in his first-ever "tweet conference." No breaking news out of it, but still interesting.

Brooklyn Decker in Esquire - Matthews' own Brooklyn Decker is on the cover of Esquire magazine this month, wearing only a sheet. Esquire's site has bonus video. I'd link to it, but our company filter blocks it. That can't be good.

Bank of America's bad week (NYT's Dealbook) - In case you missed it, Bank of America reported a loss of $2.2 billion for 2010. That Countrywide purchase is not looking so hot. BofA took a staggering $2 billion noncash writedown in goodwill for Countrywide.

The Charlotte Observer uses public records law to request 20,000 citizen email addresses from local government (WFAE). Local blogger and PR/social media consultant Scott Hepburn had this excellent blog take. Obs Editor Rick Thames feels compelled to defend/explain his paper's actions. He says the paper will only use the addresses for journalism. (My quick take, not that anyone asks: I believe Thames. But I also think that If the Observer spams 20,000 people with information about the paper, even if it is technically for journalistic purposes, that is marketing. Even if it is unintentional.)

Reader Comments:
Jan 27, 2011 09:16 am
 Posted by  Scott Hepburn

That's an intriguing take on the Observer email issue. You raise an interesting point: Is an email from a commercial entity still "commercial email" even if it's not a sales message? That distinction seems to be a critical one to Rick Thames's explanation.

I tend to lean toward your argument: It may not be a sales pitch, but it's still an unsolicited message from a commercial enterprise seeking to make its product more "saleable."

It's also not lost on me that the "product" of The Observer isn't a newspaper; it's the circulation number sold to advertisers. The data The Observer collects from its emails "for the sake of better journalism" will be used to hone the sales pitch to those advertisers.

So, in the end, it's commercial.

A fascinating topic...

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Trade & Tryon

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Named for the crossroads that marks the dead center of a lively city, this blog contains links to interesting stories about Charlotte, serious discussion of serious news, and commentary on the local media scene. This is your blog, too. Please comment early and often. Also, look for occasional announcements about the magazine or the site.

 

About Richard

Richard Thurmond is publisher of Charlotte magazine and its sister publications. He's been on staff since 1995 and served as editor from 1999 through 2012. He thinks he is funnier than he is, which is helpful information for reading this blog. Got something to say but too chicken to comment? E-mail him.

 

About Michael

Michael Graff became the executive editor of Charlotte magazine in April 2013, after four years as an editor and writer at Our State magazine. Before that, he was the Sunday enterprise reporter for The Fayetteville Observer. Before that, he was a sports writer in Winchester, Virginia, and Rocky Mount, N.C. Before that, he was the first mate on his father's charter fishing boat in Maryland. His freelance work appears in online and print publications around the country. Email him here, or find him on twitter @michaelngraff.

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