The parking lot for Asian Corners Mall, at the corner of North Tryon Street and Sugar Creek Road, looks half abandoned, but don't let a few weeds and giant potholes discourage you. A visit to Truc (rhymes with "shook") is worth the adventure in getting there.
Inside, the ambience is sophisticated and contemporary, with wooden slats covering the duct work on the ceiling. Slide into a comfortable booth and sip a mango bubble tea or a soursop smoothie (it tastes like pear or caramelized apple) while considering the menu choices in front of you.

Even if you don't care to try sea snails or frog legs, many intriguing options are available. Vietnamese food requires fresh ingredients and subtle preparation, and Truc excels in both departments. Lotus root, shrimp, mint, and lime juice combine to create a beautifully presented salad. Summer rolls with fresh mint, shrimp, bean sprouts, and vermicelli are superb in their simplicity. Roast ground rice in the bi cuon (garden delight) gives them a nuttier taste and drier texture -- less successful overall.

There is a strong do-it-yourself element to Vietnamese food -- part of the fun comes from stirring together ingredients and adding sauce to taste. Luckily, it's hard to mess this up. For entrées, the bun thit nuong (charbroiled pork with rice vermicelli) is an ideal place to start. Hu tieu xao chay -- a tofu noodle pancake -- is substantial and filling fare for vegetarians.

Truc serves a broad array of Vietnamese dishes, but what impressed us most was the service. The wait staff was knowledgeable and helpful, recommending certain menu items but always leaving the final decision up to us. Trying an unfamiliar cuisine for the first time can be intimidating and even frustrating, but the staff at Truc made the experience as smooth as the drive outside was bumpy. 

Truc
4520 N. Tryon St., No. 17
704-598-1191
$, L, D, BW.
Closed Tue.
 

">

Deceptive Appearances

The Cuisine: Vietnamese
The Place: Truc

Deceptive AppearancesThe parking lot for Asian Corners Mall, at the corner of North Tryon Street and Sugar Creek Road, looks half abandoned, but don't let a few weeds and giant potholes discourage you. A visit to Truc (rhymes with "shook") is worth the adventure in getting there.
Inside, the ambience is sophisticated and contemporary, with wooden slats covering the duct work on the ceiling. Slide into a comfortable booth and sip a mango bubble tea or a soursop smoothie (it tastes like pear or caramelized apple) while considering the menu choices in front of you.

Even if you don't care to try sea snails or frog legs, many intriguing options are available. Vietnamese food requires fresh ingredients and subtle preparation, and Truc excels in both departments. Lotus root, shrimp, mint, and lime juice combine to create a beautifully presented salad. Summer rolls with fresh mint, shrimp, bean sprouts, and vermicelli are superb in their simplicity. Roast ground rice in the bi cuon (garden delight) gives them a nuttier taste and drier texture -- less successful overall.

There is a strong do-it-yourself element to Vietnamese food -- part of the fun comes from stirring together ingredients and adding sauce to taste. Luckily, it's hard to mess this up. For entrées, the bun thit nuong (charbroiled pork with rice vermicelli) is an ideal place to start. Hu tieu xao chay -- a tofu noodle pancake -- is substantial and filling fare for vegetarians.

Truc serves a broad array of Vietnamese dishes, but what impressed us most was the service. The wait staff was knowledgeable and helpful, recommending certain menu items but always leaving the final decision up to us. Trying an unfamiliar cuisine for the first time can be intimidating and even frustrating, but the staff at Truc made the experience as smooth as the drive outside was bumpy. 

Truc
4520 N. Tryon St., No. 17
704-598-1191
$, L, D, BW.
Closed Tue.
 



Edit ModuleShow Tags

More »Related Stories

Mountain Cabin Cuisine: Stone Mountain Grill

This restauant offers familiar cuisine in a warm atmosphere

Baku Brings New Flavors to SouthPark

A trendy and traditional take on Japanese cuisine

Old World Meets New at Halcyon

The uptown eatery offers a new chef, a new menu, and a new focus on Old World techniques

Fresh Take: Cantina 1511

The restaurant has a new outlook—and more changes are on the way

We invite your responses and discussion. Please refrain from personal attacks, profanity, commercial promotion, or non sequiturs.

Add your comment:
Edit Module Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags

Newsletters

Stay up-to-date on all things Charlotte by signing up for our newsletters. Learn more by clicking here.

Newsletter Sign Up
Email*
 
Edit ModuleShow Tags Edit Module

Blogs »

Edit ModuleShow Tags


Charlotte at Home

Creating Your Space in the Queen City

Fine Rugs at Couture Knots

The showroom on Cleveland Avenue focuses on service and personalization

Comments


Revue

Andy Smith on Charlotte Arts & Culture

Symphony Donates Instruments to Charlotte Schools (Plus: This Weekend in Charlotte)

Comments


Dine & Dish

News, Notes, and Gossip About the Charlotte Restaurant Scene

Christmas Eve Dinners

Several area restaurants are offering epic Christmas Eve meals - set to fill your belly without emptying your wallet before Santa arrives

Comments


Poking the Hornet's Nest

Greg Lacour on Politics

Another Lucrative Payout

It's easy to benefit from an ethically questionable deal when so many citizens cheer it.

Comments


On Tap

Matt McKenzie on Craft Beer in Charlotte

Holiday Parties at Pint Central, Flying Saucer, Salud Beer Shop and more

Your local craft beer guide to upcoming events

Comments

Edit ModuleShow Tags