Play by Play: Charlotte Knights’ Not-So-Excellent Uptown Adventure

Here's a play by play of the soap opera below



The concept seemed simple: Take a minor league baseball team bearing our city’s name, seen languishing just over the border in Fort Mill, S.C., and move it into shiny new digs in uptown. Yet when you add to the mix a complicated land swap stadium proposal involving the city, county, and school system, plus a nasty and prolonged recession and a one-man legal filibuster, you end up with a bewildering saga with as many dramatic twists and turns as a season of Glee. We’ve charted the major plot points of the soap opera below.

 

  1. December 2005- Charlotte Center City Partners unveils complex uptown land swap stadium plan for the Third Ward.
     

  2. May 2007- Attorney/real estate developer Jerry Reese files two lawsuits to block plan. Proposes major league team/stadium instead.
     

  3. October 2007- Reese’s first two lawsuits dismissed. He vows to appeal.
     

  4. January 2008- County, city, and school board approve simplified stadium plan.
     

  5. January 2008- Reese files third lawsuit.
     

  6. March 2008- Reese files fourth lawsuit.
     

  7. May 2008- Reese’s third lawsuit dismissed.
     

  8. July 2008- Reese’s fourth lawsuit dismissed.
     

  9. October 2008- Stadium deal placed on hold due to weak economy/legal actions. Reese files fifth lawsuit.
     

  10. May 2009- Reese loses appeals of first two lawsuits. His fifth lawsuit dismissed.
     

  11. November 2009- Reese loses appeal of fourth lawsuit.
     

  12. June 2010- Reese loses appeal of third lawsuit.
     

  13. March 2011- Reese loses appeal of fifth lawsuit.
     

  14. July 2011- New stadium deadlines set by county: Knights need stadium completed by spring 2014 or lose property lease.
     

  15. February 2012- Deadlines looming. City hints at contributing up to $11 million to the project. Reese threatens another lawsuit.
     

  16. March 2012- At press time, news reports have Knights formally requesting city subsidy to build uptown stadium.
     

More »Related Stories

Secrets of the City

The Story of Charlotte, Part 7: Bills of Rights

The mills bring growth and the city expands, giving Charlotteans the freedom to live in such faraway places as the new neighborhood of Dilworth. But after a series of political fights, many residents will soon feel the full grip of oppression

Split Tickets: Charlotte's Cultural Sector

Many large local arts organizations and shows are setting records. Big money is pouring into a major fundraising campaign led by Hugh McColl. But the news isn’t good everywhere. Smaller companies are struggling, with some even shutting down. Can Charlotte sustain both?

Dr. J. Michael Bitzer: The Professor on Speed Dial

When reporters need analysis of the Tillis-Hagan race—or any other political matter, really—they call him. So how did this bow tie-wearing, statistics-loving, Southern politics-following academic from Clemson become everybody’s go-to source?

We invite your responses and discussion. Please refrain from personal attacks, profanity, commercial promotion, or non sequiturs.

Add your comment:

Newsletters

Stay up-to-date on all things Charlotte by signing up for our newsletters. Learn more by clicking here.

Newsletter Sign Up
Email*
 

Blogs »


Charlotte at Home

Creating Your Space in the Queen City

Color around the Corner

Leaves may be the seasonal star, but the roses in McGill Rose Garden are stunning

Comments


Poking the Hornet's Nest

Greg Lacour on Politics

The Undead $700 Billion Medicare Claim

Years after its death, a zombie lie abides in Karl Rove-funded ads in North Carolina. Happy Halloween.

Comments


Revue

Andy Smith on Charlotte Arts & Culture

This Weekend in Charlotte: Visuween, Ray LaMontagne, and Charlotte Symphony

Comments


Dine & Dish

News, Notes, and Gossip About the Charlotte Restaurant Scene

"Spooky" Drinks for Halloween

Happy Halloween! We've compiled a few "scary" hot drinks for the daring ... all available right in your backyard.

Comments


Poking the Hornet's Nest

Greg Lacour on Politics

Peer Review

On the ballot: a proposed constitutional amendment to allow defendants to waive the right to jury trial.

Comments