Great block party in South End; make sure you catch the next one

Last evening I attended the South End Summer Series Block Party. Apparently Social Push has been sponsoring this event each third Saturday since May. I didn’t know anything about the first two, but I made it out to this July one and I enjoyed it, increasing my fondness of South End.

The magazine’s office is located in the Design Center of the Carolinas in South End so I have the privilege of working in the area daily. I say privilege because I think South End is great. There are many cool buildings and stores there, parking is easy, there’s a stop for the soon-to-be-running light rail, and it’s less than five minutes from uptown. The block party celebrated the culture that is cultivating in South End.

 

Sponsored by clothing stores and boutiques Niche, Black Sheep, American Apparel, and Glamour Puss, all of which line Camden Road, the party was held in the block of Camden between West Park Ave. and South Tryon Street, with the street closed off. The event was advertised to be held from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. I, along with my brother and one of my friends, arrived around 7:30.

 

There was a DJ playing old-school hip hop the entire time (KRS One, Rakim, A Tribe Called Quest, etc). Word is that there was supposed to be free food; maybe it was all gone before we got there. I did, however, seem numerous bottles of Vitamin Water (on the ground unfortunately), which were complimentary as well. We ate at Phat Burrito, which was busy with people the entire time. We ate on the patio. The weather was perfect.

 

This was truly a block party. Several guys were skateboarding and performing tricks, including a kid who couldn’t have been older than nine years old. The skater scene was definitely present. It’s popular with both Black Sheep and Niche, which had their doors open for the event (and is where I assume a lot of the skaters buy their T-shirts and kicks). The B-boys were on hand, too. You know—the break dancers. I can never see too much of people spinning on their hands and head. There was even an artist creating a hip hop-inspired painting.

 

There was a good turnout. A lot of people walked through for a few minutes, while many others lined the street and sidewalks for quite some time. The DJ Jazzy Jeff concert was scheduled for later that night at Amos’ South End. I’m sure a lot of the people later made their way over for that. We ended up staying at the block party for about two hours. Afterwards, we went to the fight party at Allure, which was only about five minutes away on South Mint Street (coming from West Boulevard). I saw Bernard Hopkins win a decision over Winky Wright. The fight wasn’t very impressive, though. I think I saw a better battle between the break dancers.

 

You can catch the next installment of the block party on August 18.

Last evening I attended the South End Summer Series Block Party. Apparently Social Push has been sponsoring this event each third Saturday since May. I didn’t know anything about the first two, but I made it out to this July one and I enjoyed it, increasing my fondness of South End.

 

The magazine’s office is located in the Design Center of the Carolinas in South End so I have the privilege of working in the area daily. I say privilege because I think South End is great. There are many cool buildings and stores there, parking is easy, there’s a stop for the soon-to-be-running light rail, and it’s less than five minutes from uptown. The block party celebrated the culture that is cultivating in South End.

 

Sponsored by clothing stores and boutiques Niche, Black Sheep, American Apparel, and Glamour Puss, all of which line Camden Road, the party was held in the block of Camden between West Park Ave. and South Tryon Street, with the street closed off. The event was advertised to be held from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. I, along with my brother and one of my friends, arrived around 7:30.

 

There was a DJ playing old-school hip hop the entire time (KRS One, Rakim, A Tribe Called Quest, etc). Word is that there was supposed to be free food; maybe it was all gone before we got there. I did, however, seem numerous bottles of Vitamin Water (on the ground unfortunately), which were complimentary as well. We ate at Phat Burrito, which was busy with people the entire time. We ate on the patio. The weather was perfect.

 

This was truly a block party. Several guys were skateboarding and performing tricks, including a kid who couldn’t have been older than nine years old. The skater scene was definitely present. It’s popular with both Black Sheep and Niche, which had their doors open for the event (and is where I assume a lot of the skaters buy their T-shirts and kicks). The B-boys were on hand, too. You know—the break dancers. I can never see too much of people spinning on their hands and head. There was even an artist creating a hip hop-inspired painting.

 

There was a good turnout. A lot of people walked through for a few minutes, while many others lined the street and sidewalks for quite some time. The DJ Jazzy Jeff concert was scheduled for later that night at Amos’ South End. I’m sure a lot of the people later made their way over for that. We ended up staying at the block party for about two hours. Afterwards, we went to the fight party at Allure, which was only about five minutes away on South Mint Street (coming from West Boulevard). I saw Bernard Hopkins win a decision over Winky Wright. The fight wasn’t very impressive, though. I think I saw a better battle between the break dancers.

 

You can catch the next installment of the block party on August 18.

Categories: The Buzz, Trade & Tryon, Trade & Tryon > Culture